February Painting Wrap-Up!

Hello All,

I just realized it’s the end of the month!  February always does that to me.  Today marks the day that I painted every day for two whole months…wow and whew!  Here’s my February painting and artist wrap-up!

2/1/2014

There are Secrets under Me and My Puppet- Tribute to Jean Michel Basquiat Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Pen/Paper/Glue on Canvas

There are Secrets under Me and My Puppet- Tribute to Jean Michel Basquiat
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Pen/Paper/Glue on Canvas

 

2/2/2014

Untitled (Madonna in Tunnel)- Tribute to Martin Ramirez Linda Cleary 2014 Pen/Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

Untitled (Madonna in Tunnel)- Tribute to Martin Ramirez
Linda Cleary 2014
Pen/Ink & Acrylic on Canvas

2/3/2014

Magical Pyramids- Tribute to Alexander Calder Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on canvas

Magical Pyramids- Tribute to Alexander Calder
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on canvas

2/4/2014

Painting 35- Tribute to Sol LeWitt Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Painting 35- Tribute to Sol LeWitt
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/5/2014

Roses and Venus- Tribute to Cy Twombly Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Roses and Venus- Tribute to Cy Twombly
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/6/2014

The Storm is Here- Tribute to Mary Abbott Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

The Storm is Here- Tribute to Mary Abbott
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/7/2014

Keyboard Cat- Tribute to Louis Wain Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Keyboard Cat- Tribute to Louis Wain
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/8/2014

Untitled White 39- Tribute to Robert Ryman Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Untitled White 39- Tribute to Robert Ryman
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/9/2014

Electric- Tribute to Brice Marden Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Electric- Tribute to Brice Marden
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/10/2014

I've Been Asleep my Whole Life- Tribute to Camille Rose Garcia Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

I’ve Been Asleep my Whole Life- Tribute to Camille Rose Garcia
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/11/2014

Taco Man- Tribute to Karel Appel Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Taco Man- Tribute to Karel Appel
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/12/2014

Painting Number 43- Tribute to Franz Kline Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Painting Number 43- Tribute to Franz Kline
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/13/2014

Subtle Feelings- Tribute to Agnes Martin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Graphite on Canvas

Subtle Feelings- Tribute to Agnes Martin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Graphite on Canvas

2/14/2014

Grumplestiltskin- Tribute to Norman Bluhm Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Grumplestiltskin- Tribute to Norman Bluhm
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/15/2014

Untitled 46- Tribute to Josef Albers Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Untitled 46- Tribute to Josef Albers
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/16/2014

Abstract Distract- Tribute to Michael Goldberg Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Abstract Distract- Tribute to Michael Goldberg
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/17/2014

Keeping Calm- Tribute to Sir Howard Hodgkin Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Keeping Calm- Tribute to Sir Howard Hodgkin
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/18/2014

Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

Rest In Peace PSH- Tribute to Robert Rauschenberg
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic/Newspaper on Foam board and wood panel

2/19/2014

Szögek és körök- Tribute to László Moholy-Nagy Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Szögek és körök- Tribute to László Moholy-Nagy
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/20/2014

Windmill- Tribute to Peter Lanyon Linda Cleary- 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Windmill- Tribute to Peter Lanyon
Linda Cleary- 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/21/2014

Untitled 52- Tribute to Hans Hartung Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Untitled 52- Tribute to Hans Hartung
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/22/2014

2014 D- Tribute to Clyfford Still Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

2014 D- Tribute to Clyfford Still
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/23/2014

Mono-Boob- Tribute to Yves Klein Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Mono-Boob- Tribute to Yves Klein
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/24/2014

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Alexej von Jawlensky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Alexej von Jawlensky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/25/2014

Yellow & Black- Tribute to Ellsworth Kelly Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Yellow & Black- Tribute to Ellsworth Kelly
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/26/2014

Country meets City- Tribute to Nicolas de Staël Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Country meets City- Tribute to Nicolas de Staël
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/27/2014

Two Women- Tribute to Willem De Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Two Women- Tribute to Willem De Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

2/28/2014

Recluse- Tribute to Robert Motherwell Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Recluse- Tribute to Robert Motherwell
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

And that’s February folks!  Now onto March.  I think some people reserved some of these paintings as well, but please let me know if you’re interested in reserving any for yourself.  Thanks so much for your support.  I know many people visit the blog and mostly comment on Facebook instead of here.  I appreciate your comments and encouragement!  It’s what keeps me going.

xoxo, Linda

Day Fifty-Nine- Robert Motherwell- Walking on the Rainbow Trail

It’s Day 59 and my body is still filled with anxiety and knots from various things going on.  I’m settled into the house, but my mind is still unsettled.  I feel like there’s all these things I’m forgetting to get done.  So what better thing to do than to paint another abstract painting? 🙂  Join me in celebrating Robert Motherwell today!

Robert Motherwell

Robert Motherwell

Robert Motherwell (January 24, 1915 – July 16, 1991) was an American painter, printmaker, and editor. He was one of the youngest of the New York School (a phrase he coined), which also included Philip Guston, Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko.

Robert Motherwell

Robert Motherwell

Robert Motherwell was born in Aberdeen, Washington on January 24, 1915, the first child of Robert Burns Motherwell II and Margaret Hogan Motherwell. The family later moved to San Francisco, where Motherwell’s father served as president of Wells Fargo Bank. Due to the artist’s asthmatic condition, Motherwell was reared largely on the Pacific Coast and spent most of his school years in California. There he developed a love for the broad spaces and bright colours that later emerged as essential characteristics of his abstract paintings (ultramarine blue of the sky and ochre yellow of Californian hills). His later concern with themes of mortality can likewise be traced to his frail health as a child.

Between 1932 and 1937, Motherwell briefly studied painting at California School

Robert Motherwell

Robert Motherwell

of Fine Arts, San Francisco and received a BA inphilosophy from Stanford University. At Stanford Motherwell was introduced to modernism through his extensive reading of symbolistliterature, especially Mallarmé, James Joyce, Edgar Allan Poe, and Octavio Paz. This passion stayed with Motherwell for the rest of his life and became a major theme of his later paintings and drawings.

At the age of 20 Motherwell traveled to Europe with his father and sister. They made a Grand Tour starting in Paris, then went to Amalfi, Italy; Switzerland; Germany; The Netherlands; and London; and ended in Motherwell, Scotland.

Robert Motherwell

Robert Motherwell

From Motherwell’s own words, the reason he went to Harvard was because he wanted to be a painter, while his father urged him to pursue a more secure career: “And finally after months of really a cold war he made a very generous agreement with me that if I would get a Ph.D. so that I would be equipped to teach in a college as an economic insurance, he would give me fifty dollars a week for the rest of my life to do whatever I wanted to do on the assumption that with fifty dollars I could not starve but it would be no inducement to last. So with that agreed on Harvard then—it was actually the last year—Harvard still had the best philosophy school in the world. And since I had taken my degree at Stanford in philosophy, and since he didn’t care what the Ph.D. was in, I went on to Harvard.”

At Harvard, Motherwell studied under Arthur Oncken Lovejoy and David Wite Prall; to research the writings of Eugène Delacroix he spent a year in Paris, where he met an American composerArthur Berger. In fact, it was Berger who advised Motherwell to continue his education at Columbia University, under Meyer Shapiro.

In 1940, Motherwell moved to New York to study at Columbia University, where he was encouraged by Meyer Schapiro to devote

La Danse- Robert Motherwell

La Danse- Robert Motherwell

himself to painting rather than scholarship. Shapiro introduced the young artist to a group of exiled Parisian Surrealists (Max Ernst, Duchamp, Masson) and arranged for Motherwell to study with Kurt Seligmann. The time that Motherwell spent with the Surrealists proved to be influential to his artistic process. After a 1941 voyage with Roberto Matta to Mexico—on a boat where he met Maria, an actress and his future wife—Motherwell decided to make painting his primary vocation.  The sketches Motherwell made in Mexico later evolved into his first important paintings, such as Little Spanish Prison (1941), and Pancho Villa, Dead and Alive (1943) (both in MoMA collection).

It was Matta who introduced Motherwell to the concept of “automatic” drawings. The Surrealists often deployed the process of automatism, or abstract “automatic” doodling to tap into their unconscious.  This concept had a lasting effect on Motherwell and on other American painters such as Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner and William Baziotes, whom he befriended in New York after a trip to Mexico.

Robert Motherwell

Robert Motherwell

Upon return from Mexico Motherwell spent time developing his creative principle based on automatism: “what I realized was that Americans potentially could paint like angels but that there was no creative principle around, so that everybody who liked modern art was copying it. Gorky was copying Picasso. Pollock was copying Picasso. De Kooning was copying Picasso. I mean I say this unqualifiedly. I was painting French intimate pictures or whatever. And all we needed was a creative principle, I mean something that would mobilize this capacity to paint in a creative way, and that’s what Europe had that we hadn’t had; we had always followed in their wake. And I thought of all the possibilities of free association—because I also had a psychoanalytic background and I understood the implications—might be the best chance to really make something entirely new which everybody agreed was the thing to do.”

Thus, in the early 1940s, Robert Motherwell played a significant role in laying the foundations for

Robert Motherwell

Robert Motherwell

the new movement of Abstract Expressionism (or the New York School): “Matta wanted to start a revolution, a movement, within Surrealism. He asked me to find some other American artists that would help start a new movement. It was then that Baziotes and I went to see Pollock and de Kooning and Hofmann and Kamrowski and Busa and several other people. And if we could come with something. Peggy Guggenheim who liked us said that she would put on a show of this new business. And so I went around explaining the theory of automatism to everybody because the only way that you could have a movement was that it had some common principle. It sort of all began that way.”

Robert Motherwell

Robert Motherwell

In 1942 Motherwell began to exhibit his work in New York and in 1944 he had his first one-man show at Peggy Guggenheim’s “Art of This Century” gallery; that same year the MoMA was the first museum to purchase one of his works. From the mid-1940s, Motherwell became the leading spokesman for avant-garde art in America. His circle came to include William Baziotes, David Hare, Barnett Newman, and Mark Rothko, with whom he eventually started the Subjects of the Artist School (1948–49). In 1949 Motherwell divorced Maria Emilia Ferreira y Moyeros and in 1950 he married Betty Little, with whom he had two daughters.

In 1948, he began to work with his celebrated Elegy to the Spanish Republic theme, which he continued to develop throughout his life. Motherwell intended his Elegies to the Spanish Republic (over 100 paintings, completed between 1948 and 1967) as a “lamentation or funeral song” after the Spanish Civil War. His recurring motif here is a rough black oval, repeated in varying sizes and degrees of compression and distortion. Instead of appearing as holes leading into a deeper space, these light-absorbent blots stand out against a ground of relatively even, predominantly white upright rectangles. They have various associations, but Motherwell himself related them to the display of the dead bull’s testicles in the Spanish bullfighting ring.

Throughout the 1950s Motherwell also taught painting at Hunter College in New York and at Black Mountain College in North

Robert Motherwell

Robert Motherwell

Carolina. Cy Twombly, Robert Rauschenberg and Kenneth Nolandstudied under and were influenced by Motherwell. At this time, he was a prolific writer and lecturer, and in addition to directing the influential Documents of Modern Art Series, he edited The Dada Painters and Poets: An Anthology, which was published in 1951.

From 1954 to 1958, during the break-up of his second marriage, he worked on a small series of paintings which incorporated the words Je t’aime, expressing his most intimate and private feelings. His collages began to incorporate material from his studio such as cigarette packets and labels becoming records of his daily life. He was married for the third time, from 1958 to 1971, to Helen Frankenthaler, a successful abstract painter.

On July 20, 1991, several hundred people attended a memorial service for Motherwell on the beach outside his Provincetown home. Among them were the writer Norman Mailer and the photographer Joel Meyerowitz, both Provincetown summer residents. Speakers included the poet Stanley Kunitz, who read a poem that was a favorite of Motherwell’s, William Butler Yeats’sSailing to Byzantium; Senator Howard M. Metzenbaum, Democrat of Ohio, an acquaintance of Motherwell’s; and other artists, friends, and family members.

Read the rest of his extensive biography at wikipedia.

Walk on a rainbow trail; walk on a trail of song, and all about you will be beauty. There is a way out of every dark mist, over a rainbow trail.

Starting with ochre…obviously. :)

Starting with ochre…obviously. 🙂

Motherwell’s type of abstract painting is something I can understand.  I really enjoyed painting this piece this morning.  I’d like to eventually try this on a huge canvas.

I hope you enjoy my piece.  I think it turned out well.  I will see you tomorrow…day 60!  That means 60 paintings total so far.  Only 305 to go.  Whew.

xoxo, Linda

Recluse- Tribute to Robert Motherwell Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Recluse- Tribute to Robert Motherwell
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Recluse- Tribute to Robert Motherwell Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Recluse- Tribute to Robert Motherwell
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Recluse- Tribute to Robert Motherwell Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Recluse- Tribute to Robert Motherwell
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Recluse- Tribute to Robert Motherwell Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Recluse- Tribute to Robert Motherwell
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Recluse- Tribute to Robert Motherwell Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Recluse- Tribute to Robert Motherwell
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

 

 

Day Fifty-Eight- Willem De Kooning- Living to Paint

Day 58 and things are kind of settling down a little at the new house.  I just need to unpack some more and new appliances arrive on Saturday, so I’ve been shifting boxes around downstairs.  I still feel like a big ball of tension knots…but, I’m happy.  Please join me in celebrating Willem De Kooning today!

Willem De Kooning 1950

Willem De Kooning 1950

Willem de Kooning (April 24, 1904 – March 19, 1997) was a Dutch American abstract expressionist artist who was born in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Willem De Kooning

Willem De Kooning

In the post-World War II era, de Kooning painted in a style that came to be referred to as Abstract expressionism or Action painting, and was part of a group of artists that came to be known as the New York School. Other painters in this group included Jackson Pollock, Elaine de Kooning, Lee Krasner, Franz Kline, Arshile Gorky, Mark Rothko, Hans Hofmann, Adolph Gottlieb, Anne Ryan, Robert Motherwell, Philip Guston, and Clyfford Still.

In September 2011 de Kooning’s work was honored with a large-scale retrospective

Willem De Kooning

Willem De Kooning

exhibition: de Kooning: A Retrospective September 18, 2011 – January 9, 2012 at MoMA in New York City. Organized by John Elderfield it was the first major museum exhibition devoted to the full breadth and depth of de Kooning’s career, containing nearly 200 works.

Willem de Kooning was born April 24, 1904 in the working class district of Rotterdam Noord (North Rotterdam) to parents Leendert de Kooning and Cornelia Nobel.  His parents divorced on January 7, 1907 and de Kooning lived with his mother .  His early artistic training included eight years at the Rotterdam Academy of Fine Arts and Techniques.  In the 1920s he worked as an assistant to the art director of a Rotterdam department store.  He moved to the USA as a stowaway in 1926 aboard the British freighter SS Shelley.  De Kooning was one of the thirty-eight artists chosen from a general invitation to New York City metropolitan artists to design and paint the 105 public murals at the 1939 New York World’s Fair.  His fellow muralist, David Margolis later recounted their 1932 trips to the Savoy Ballroom and de Kooning’s “keen interest in jazz.”

Willem De Kooning

Willem De Kooning

In 1938, probably under the influence of Arshile Gorky, de Kooning embarked on a series of male figures, including Two Men StandingMan, and Seated Figure (Classic Male), while simultaneously embarking on a more purist series of lyrically colored abstractions, such as Pink Landscape and Elegy. As his work progressed, the heightened colors and elegant lines of the abstractions began to creep into the more figurative works, and the coincidence of figures and abstractions continued well into the 1940s. This period includes the representational but somewhat geometricized Woman and Standing Man, along with numerous untitled abstractions whose biomorphic forms increasingly suggest the presence of figures. By about 1945 the two tendencies seemed to fuse perfectly in Pink Angels.

In 1938, de Kooning met Elaine Marie Fried, later known as Elaine de Kooning, whom he married in 1943. She also became a

Willem De Kooning

Willem De Kooning

significant artist. During the 1940s, he became increasingly identified with the Abstract Expressionist movement and was recognized as one of its leaders into the mid-1950s, while notoriously stating: “It is disastrous to name ourselves.” In 1948, de Kooning had his first one-man show, which consisted of his black-and-white enamel compositions, at the Charles Egan Gallery in New York. He taught at Black Mountain College in North Carolina in 1948 and at the Yale School of Art in 1950/51. In 1950, de Kooning was one of 17 prominent Abstract Expressionists andavant-garde artists to sign an open letter to the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art accusing it of hostility towards “advanced art.”

Figures in Landscape- Willem De Kooning

Figures in Landscape- Willem De Kooning

In 1959, de Kooning bought five acres of land off Springs’ Fireplace Road in Southampton from the photographer and sculptor Wilfrid Zogbaum and began construction on what was then considered the largest artist’s studio built in the Hamptons.

The attitude that nature is chaotic and that the artist puts order into it is a very absurd point of view, I think. All that we can hope for is to put some order into ourselves.
— Willem de Kooning

In 1946, too poor to buy artists’ pigments, he turned to black and white household enamels to paint a series of large abstractions; of these works, Light in August (c. 1946) and Black Friday(1948) are essentially black with white elements, whereas Zurich (1947) and Mailbox (1947/48) are white with black. Developing out of these works in the period after his first show were complex, agitated abstractions such as Asheville (1948/49), Attic (1949), and Excavation (1950; Art Institute of Chicago), which reintroduced color and seem to sum up with taut decisiveness the problems of free-associative composition he had struggled with for many years.

Asheville- Willem De Kooning

Asheville- Willem De Kooning

The hallmark of de Kooning’s style was an emphasis on complex figure ground ambiguity. Background figures would overlap other figures causing them to appear in the foreground, which in turn might be overlapped by dripping lines of paint thus positioning the area into the background.

De Kooning had painted women regularly in the early 1940s and again from 1947 to 1949. The biomorphic shapes of his early abstractions were derived from objects found in the studio. But it was not until 1950 that he began to explore the subject of women exclusively. In the summer of that year he began Woman I (located at the Museum of Modern Art, New York City), which went through innumerable metamorphoses before it was finished in 1952.

During this period he also created other paintings of women. These works were shown at the Sidney Janis Gallery in 1953 and caused a sensation, partially because they were figurative when most of his fellow Abstract Expressionists were painting abstractly, but also because of their blatant imagery. Aggressive brushwork and strategically placed high-key colors in these paintings merged with images of toothy snarls, overripe, pendulous breasts, enlarged eyes and blasted extremities to reveal a woman seemingly congruent with some of modern man’s most widely held sexual fears. Some of these paintings also appeared to reference early Mesopotamian / Akkadian works, with the large eyes and squarely chiseled bodies.

Willem De Kooning 1949

Willem De Kooning 1949

The Woman paintings II through VI (1952–53) are all variants on this theme, as are Woman and Bicycle (1953; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York) and Two Women in the Country (1954). The deliberate vulgarity of these paintings contrast with the French painter Jean Dubuffet’s Corps de Dame series of 1950, in which iconic female/goddess imagery was created with a topography of earth colours, and are generally perceived as less provocative.

Woman Painting- Willem De Kooning

Woman Painting- Willem De Kooning

From the late 1950s to the early 1960s, De Kooning entered a new phase of nearly pure abstractions more related to landscape than to the human figure. These paintings, such as Bolton Landing (1957) and Door to the River (1960), bear broad brushstrokes and calligraphic tendencies similar to works of his contemporary Franz Kline.

In 1963, De Kooning moved permanently to East Hampton, Long Island, and returned to depicting women while also referencing the landscape in such paintings as Woman, Sag harbor and Clam Diggers. In June 1968 Willem went to Rome on holiday and ran into an old friend Herzl Emanuel while staying with Emmanuel he excitedly began to produce a series of thirteen small clay sculptures in the style of his women series of paintings. After returning to the US he commissioned David Christian to enlarge and cast them in bronze.

De Kooning was highly prolific during the 1980s, painting more than 300 canvases.  During his later years, his health began to fail; by 1987 he began showing signs of dementia and was diagnosed with the probability of suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.  After his wife Elaine died on February 1, 1989, his daughter, Lisa (Johanna Liesbeth de Kooning 1956-2012), and his lawyers, Lee and John Eastman were granted guardianship over De Kooning.

There is much debate over the significance of his 1980s paintings, which became clean, sparse, and almost graphic, while alluding to the biomorphic lines of his early works. Some have said that his very last works present a new direction of compositional complexity and color juxtaposition, and are prophetic of directions that some current painters continue to pursue. Some speculate that his mental condition and years of alcoholism had rendered him unable to carry out the mastery indicated in his early works. Others claim some of these paintings were removed from the studio and exhibited before de Kooning was finished with them. Unfortunately, de Kooning’s last works have not been afforded the amount of critical commentary or substantial serious assessment that his earlier works received.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I’m not sure how I feel about my painting today.  I feel like I’m still trying to grasp how to go about painting abstractly.  I don’t feel like I am ever finished when I paint this way.  I think the painting is so-so, but I’m not sure if I captured De Kooning’s essence.  Oh well, it’s all a part of this experience!  I hope you enjoy the piece regardless and I will see you tomorrow on day 59!  Paint, paint, paint!

xoxo, Linda

Two Women- Tribute to Willem De Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Two Women- Tribute to Willem De Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Two Women- Tribute to Willem De Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Two Women- Tribute to Willem De Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Two Women- Tribute to Willem De Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Two Women- Tribute to Willem De Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Two Women- Tribute to Willem De Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Two Women- Tribute to Willem De Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Two Women- Tribute to Willem De Kooning Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Two Women- Tribute to Willem De Kooning
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

I don’t paint to live, I live to paint.

 

Day Fifty-Seven- Nicolas de Staël- Painting with a Thousand Vibrations

It’s Day 57 and I’m rushing around trying to clean the old house and then get stuff done at the new one.  I woke up extra early and painted my painting and then I need to shower, eat and head out to improv…missed 2 weeks of class because of my move!  Join me in celebrating Nicolas de Stael today!

Nicolas de Staël

Nicolas de Staël

Nicolas de Staël

Nicolas de Staël

Nicolas de Staël  January 5, 1914, Saint Petersburg – March 16, 1955, Antibes) (French nationality, of Russian origin) was a painter known for his use of a thick impasto and his highly abstract landscape painting. He also worked with collage, illustration and textiles.

Nicolas de Staël was born Николай Владимирович Шталь фон Гольштейн

Nicolas de Staël

Nicolas de Staël

(Nikolai Vladimirovich Stael von Holstein) in the family of a Russian Lieutenant General, Baron Vladimir Stael von Holstein, (a member of the Staël von Holstein family, and the last Commandant of the Peter and Paul Fortress) and his second wife, Lubov Vladimirovna Berednikova (his first wife was Olga Sakhanskaya). De Staël’s family was forced to emigrate to Poland in 1919 because of the Russian Revolution; both his father and stepmother died in Poland and the orphaned Nicolas de Staël was sent with his older sister Marina to Brussels to live with a Russian family (1922).

Nicolas de Staël

Nicolas de Staël

He eventually studied art at the Brussels Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts (1932). In the 1930s, he travelled throughout Europe, lived in Paris (1934) and in Morocco (1936) (where he first met his companion Jeannine Guillou, also a painter and who would appear in some of his paintings from 1941–1942) and Algeria. In 1936 he had his first exhibition of Byzantine style icons and watercolors at the Galerie Dietrich et Cie, Brussels. He joined the French Foreign Legion in 1939 and was demobilized in 1941. Sometime in 1940 he met one of his future dealers Jeanne Bucher.

In 1941, he moved to Nice where he met Jean Arp, Sonia Delaunay and Robert Delaunay, and these artists would inspire his first abstract paintings, or “Compositions”. In 1942, Jeannine and Nicolas de Staël’s daughter Anne was

Nicolas de Staël

Nicolas de Staël

born. The growing family also included Jeannine’s nine-year-old son Antoine. In 1943 (during the Nazi occupation), de Staël returned to Paris with Jeannine, but the war years were extremely difficult. During the war his paintings were included in several group exhibitions and in 1944 he had his first one-man exhibition at the Galerie l’Esquisse. In April 1945, he had a one-man exhibition at the Galerie Jeanne Bucher and in May 1945 his paintings were included in the first Salon de Mai. De Staël’s work was also included in the Salon d’Automne that year. In Paris in 1944, he met and befriended Georges Braque, and by 1945 his exhibitions brought him critical fame. However times were so difficult, and successes came too late as Jeannine died in February 1946, from illness brought on by malnutrition.

Nicolas de Staël- Noon Landscape

Nicolas de Staël- Noon Landscape

De Staël met Françoise Chapouton in the spring of 1946, and they married in May. In October 1946 thanks to his friendship with artist André Lanskoy (whom he met in 1944) de Staël made a contract with Louis Carré who agreed to buy all the paintings that he produced. By January 1947 the de Staël family moved into larger quarters thanks to increased recognition and increased sales. In 1947 he befriended his neighbor American private art dealer Theodore Schempp. De Stael’s new studio in Paris was very close to Georges Braque’s and the two painters became very close friends. In April 1947 his second daughter Laurence was born. In April 1948 his son Jerome was born, also that same year in Paris he began a long friendship with German artist Johnny Friedlaender.

His paintings began to attract attention worldwide. In 1950 he had a one-man exhibition at the Galerie Jacques Dubourg in Paris

Nicolas de Staël

Nicolas de Staël

and Schempp introduced de Stael’s paintings to New York, with a private exhibition at his Upper East Side apartment. He sold several paintings to important collectors including Duncan Phillips of the Phillips Collection. He had considerable success in the United States, and England in the early 1950s. In 1950 Leo Castelli organized a group exhibition at the Sidney Janis Gallery in New York City that included him. In 1952, He had one-man exhibitions in London, Montevideo, and in Paris. In March 1953, he had his first official one-man exhibition at M. Knoedler & Co. in New York City.

Nicolas de Staël

Nicolas de Staël

The show was both a commercial and critical success. In 1953 he had an exhibition at the Phillips Gallery in Washington DC, (known today as The Phillips Collection in Washington DC) and they acquired two more of his canvasses. Visiting the United States in 1953 de Staël and Francoise visited MoMA, the Barnes Foundation in Merion, Pennsylvania and various other important institutions.

After returning to Paris, de Staël met visiting New York art dealer Paul Rosenberg who offered de Staël an exclusive contract. De Staël signed with Paul Rosenberg partially because Rosenberg was French and because he was an important New York art dealer who showed many Cubist painters whom Nicolas de Staël admired. By the end of 1953 the demand for de Staël’s paintings was so great that Paul Rosenberg raised his prices and continually requested more paintings. The demand was so high for his planned spring 1954 exhibition, that Rosenberg requested an additional fifteen paintings. Once again this exhibition was both commercially and critically successful. In April 1954 de Staël’s fourth child Gustave was born. In that spring he had a successful exhibition in Paris at Jacques Dubourg’s gallery. His new paintings marked his departure from abstraction and a return to figuration, still-life and landscape.

In the fall of 1954, he moved with his family to Antibes.

But by 1953, de Staël’s depression led him to seek isolation in the south of France (eventually in Antibes). He suffered from exhaustion, insomnia and depression. In the wake of a disappointing meeting with a disparaging art critic on March 16, 1955 he committed suicide. He leapt to his death from his eleventh story studio terrace, in Antibes. He was 41 years old.

Biography is from wikipedia.

I really enjoyed doing research and looking at Nicolas de Staël’s pieces.  There’s something I really liked about the aesthetic and style.  I of course decided to do a landscape.  I hope you enjoy my piece and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 58…getting close to 60!  Wow, I really cannot believe I’m still doing this.  I can’t wait to get settled in and really delve into this project to the next level!

Best, Linda

Country meets City- Tribute to Nicolas de Staël Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Country meets City- Tribute to Nicolas de Staël
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Country meets City- Tribute to Nicolas de Staël Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Country meets City- Tribute to Nicolas de Staël
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Country meets City- Tribute to Nicolas de Staël Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Country meets City- Tribute to Nicolas de Staël
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Country meets City- Tribute to Nicolas de Staël Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Country meets City- Tribute to Nicolas de Staël
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3 Country meets City- Tribute to Nicolas de Staël Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 3
Country meets City- Tribute to Nicolas de Staël
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

You never paint what you see or think you see. You paint with a thousand vibrations the blow that has struck you: how can you be struck and not cry out in anger? (Nicholas de Stael)

 

 

 

 

Day Fifty-Six- Ellsworth Kelly- Mass and Color

It’s Day 56 and I’m starting to relax a bit in my new home!  Still tons and tons to do, but I can’t complain.  This week is still going to be quite busy so I chose another “simple” artist.  I say “simple” in the most irrelevant sense because I’ve found that I’ve been wrong in so many instances.  🙂  Please join me in paying tribute to Ellsworth Kelly today.

Ellsworth Kelly

Ellsworth Kelly

Ellsworth Kelly

Ellsworth Kelly

Ellsworth Kelly (born May 31, 1923) is an American painter, sculptor, and printmaker associated with hard-edge painting, Color Field painting and the minimalist school. His works demonstrate unassuming techniques emphasizing simplicity of form, similar to the work of John McLaughlin andKenneth Noland. Kelly often employs bright colors. He lives and works in Spencertown, New York.

Kelly was born the second son of three to Allan Howe Kelly and Florence Bithens Kelly in

Ellsworth Kelly

Ellsworth Kelly

Newburgh, New York, a town approximately 60 miles north of New York City.  His father was an insurance company executive of Scots-Irish and German descent. His mother was a former schoolteacher of Welsh and Pennsylvania-German stock. His family moved from Newburgh to New Jersey shortly after he was born. Kelly remembers his mother moving his family each year to a different house. They lived in many places in New Jersey both in and around the Hackensack area.

Ellsworth Kelly

Ellsworth Kelly

Many of Kelly’s memories are of the time they lived in Oradell a town of nearly 7,500 people. His family lived near the Oradell Reservoir, where his paternal grandmother Rosenlieb introduced him to bird watching at the age of eight or nine. Bird watching helped Kelly train his eyes and develop his appreciation for the physical reality of the world by focusing on nature’s shapes. He developed his passion for form and color.

As part of his interest, he studied the works of Louis Agassiz Fuertes and John James Audubon. Audubon had a particularly strong influence on Kelly’s work throughout his career. Author E.C. Goossen speculates that the two and three-color paintings (such as Three Panels: Red Yellow Blue, I 1963) for which Kelly is so well known can be traced to his bird watching, and his study of the two and three-color birds he saw so frequently at an early age. Kelly has said he was often alone as a young boy and became somewhat of a “loner”. He had a slight stutter that persisted into his teenage years.

Kelly attended public school, where art classes stressed materials and sought to develop the “artistic imagination”. This curriculum

Ellsworth Kelly

Ellsworth Kelly

was typical of the broader trend in schooling that had emerged from the Progressive education theories promulgated by the Columbia University Teacher’s College, at which the American modernist painter Arthur Wesley Dow had taught.  Although his parents were reluctant to support Kelly’s art training, a school teacher encouraged him to go further.  As his parents would pay only for technical training, Kelly studied first atPratt Institute in Brooklyn, which he attended from 1941 until he was inducted into the Army on New Year’s Day 1943.

While in Paris, Kelly had continued to paint the figure but by May 1949, he made his first abstract paintings. Observing how light dispersed on the surface of water, he painted Seine (1950), made of black and white rectangles arranged by chance. In 1952 he started a series of eight collages titled Spectrum Colors Arranged by Chance I to VIII. He created it by using numbered slips of paper; each referred to a colour, one of eighteen different hues to be placed on a grid 40 inches by 40 inches. Each of the eight collages used a different process.

Ellsworth Kelly

Ellsworth Kelly

Kelly’s discovery in 1952 of Monet’s late work infused him with a new freedom of painterly expression: he began working in extremely large formats and explored the concepts of seriality and monochrome paintings. As a painter he worked from then on in an exclusively abstract mode. By the late 1950s, his painting stressed shape and planar masses (often assuming non-rectilinear formats). His work of this period also provided a useful bridge from the vanguard American geometric abstraction of the 1930s and early 1940s to the Minimalism and reductive art of the mid-1960s and 1970s. Kelly’s relief painting Blue Tablet (1962), for example, was included in the seminal 1963 exhibition, Toward a New Abstraction, at the Jewish Museum.

During the 1960s he started working with irregularly angled canvases. Yellow Piece (1966), the artist’s first shaped canvas, represents Kelly’s pivotal break with the rectangular support and his redefinition of painting’s figure/ground relationship. With its curved corners and single, all-encompassing color, the canvas itself becomes the composition, transforming the wall behind it into the picture’s ground.  In the 1970s he added curved shapes to his repertoire.  Green White (1968) marks the debut appearance of the triangle in Kelly’s oeuvre, a shape that reoccurs throughout his career; the painting is composed of two distinct, shaped monochromatic canvases, which are installed on top of each other: a large-scale, inverted, green trapezoid is positioned vertically above of a smaller white triangle, forming a new geometric composition.

After leaving New York City for Spencertown in 1970, he rented a former theater in the nearby town of Chatham, allowing to work

Ellsworth Kelly

Ellsworth Kelly

in a studio more spacious than any he had previously occupied. After working there for a year, Kelly embarked on a series of 14 paintings that would become the Chatham Series. Each work takes the form of an inverted ell, and is made of two joined canvases, each canvas a monochrome of a different color. The works vary in proportion and palette from one to the next; careful attention was paid to the size of each panel and the color selected in order to achieve balance and contrast between the two.

A larger series of twelve works which Kelly started in 1972 and did not complete until 1983, Gray was originally conceived as an anti-war statement and is drained of color.  In 1979 he used curves in two-colour paintings made of separate panels.

In his recent painting, Kelly has distilled his palette and introduced new forms. In each work, he starts with a rectangular canvas which he carefully paints with many coats of white paint; a shaped canvas, mostly painted black, is placed on top.

Partial biography from wikipedia.

I hope you enjoy my piece in honor of this wonderful artist.  See you tomorrow on day 57!  I’m going to continue watching my Vikings marathon now. 🙂  Best, Linda

Yellow & Black- Tribute to Ellsworth Kelly Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Yellow & Black- Tribute to Ellsworth Kelly
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Yellow & Black- Tribute to Ellsworth Kelly Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Yellow & Black- Tribute to Ellsworth Kelly
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Day Fifty-Five- Alexej von Jawlensky- Painting from the Soul

Day 55…third day in my new home.  Love it so far.  Still stressed with dealing with the old place (gotta go clean and get rid of crap) and unpacking etc.  I was grateful that I had to just sit down and paint today!  Join me in celebrating Alexej von Jawlensky today.

Alexej von Jawlensky

Alexej von Jawlensky

ALEXEJ VON JAWLENSKY SCHOKKO (SCHOKKO MIT TELLERHUT)

ALEXEJ VON JAWLENSKY
SCHOKKO (SCHOKKO MIT TELLERHUT)

Alexej Georgewitsch von Jawlensky (13 March 1864 – 15 March 1941) was a Russian expressionist painter active in Germany. He was a key member of the New Munich Artist’s Association (Neue Künstlervereinigung München), Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) group and later the Die Blaue Vier (The Blue Four).

Alexej von Jawlensky was born in Torzhok, a town in Tver Governorate, Russia, as the

Jawlensky

Jawlensky

fifth child of Georgi von Jawlensky and his wife Alexandra (née Medwedewa). At the age of ten he moved with his family to Moscow. After a few years of military training, he became interested in painting, visiting the Moscow World Exposition c. 1880. Thanks to his good social connections, he managed to get himself posted to St. Petersburg and, from 1889 to 1896, studied at the art academy there, while also discharging his military duties.  Jawlensky gained admittance to the circle of Ilya Repin, where he met Marianne von Werefkin, one of Repin’s former students and a wealthy artist four years Jawlensly’s senior who gave up her career to promote his work and provide him with a comfortable lifestyle.

Jawlensky

Jawlensky

Free to pursue his artistic vision, he moved to Munich in 1894, where he studied in the private school of Anton Ažbe. In 1905 Jawlensky visited Ferdinand Hodler, and two years later he began his long friendship with Jan Verkade and met Paul Sérusier. Together, Verkade and Sérusier transmitted to Jawlensky both practical and theoretical elements of the work of the Nabis, and Synthetist principles of art.

In Munich he met Wassily Kandinsky and various other Russian artists, and he contributed to the Alexej_von_Jawlensky_-_Kopf_einer_Italienerin_mit_schwarzem_Haarformation of the Neue Künstlervereinigung München. His work in this period was lush and richly coloured, but later moved towards abstraction and a simplified, formulaic style. Between 1908 and 1910 Jawlensky and Werefkin spent summers in the Bavarian Alps with Kandinsky and his companion Gabriele Münter. Here, through painting landscapes of their mountainous surroundings, they experimented with one another’s techniques and discussed the theoretical bases of their art.  Following a trip to the Baltic coast, and renewed contact with Henri Matisse in 1911 and Emil Nolde in 1912, Jawlensky turned increasingly to the expressive use of colour and form alone in his portraits.

Jawlensky

Jawlensky

Expelled from Germany in 1914, he moved to Switzerland. He met Emmy Scheyer in 1916 (Jawlensky gave her the affectionate nickname, Galka, a Russian word for crow), another artist who abandoned her own work to champion his in the United States.  After a hiatus in experimentation with the human form, Jawlensky produced perhaps his best-known series, the Mystical Heads (1917–19), and the Saviour’s Faces (1918–20), which are reminiscent of the traditional Russian Orthodox icons of his childhood.

In 1922, after marrying Werefkin’s former maid Hélène Nesnakomoff, the mother of

Jawlensky- Mystical Head

Jawlensky- Mystical Head

his only son, Andreas, born before their marriage, Jawlensky took up residence in Wiesbaden. In 1924 he organized the Blue Four, whose works, thanks to Scheyer’s tireless promotion, were jointly exhibited in Germany and the USA. From 1929 Jawlensky suffered from progressively crippling arthritis, which necessitated a reduced scale and finally forced a cessation in his painting in 1937.  He began to dictate his memoirs in 1938. He died in Wiesbaden, Germany, on 15 March 1941. He and his wife Helene are buried in the cemetery of St. Elizabeth’s Church, Wiesbaden.

Biography is from wikipedia.

Yes, I look bored…but am definitely not. :)

Yes, I look bored…but am definitely not. 🙂

This painting was super fun to delve into today.  I showcased mainly his portraits because I decided to do a self-portrait of myself.  I took a reference photo to work with.

It was an interesting experience to use colors to shade my skin in with that I wouldn’t have normally used.  Well,

Yellow skin?  It works!

Yellow skin? It works!

I hope you enjoy my painting for today and I’ll see you tomorrow on Day 56!  I’m going to go unpack my clothes and put them away and then take an epic bath in my new awesome bathtub!

Best, Linda

Painting on my new countertop.  I can't wait until my art studio/space is ready.  That'll be a while.

Painting on my new countertop. I can’t wait until my art studio/space is ready. That’ll be a while.

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Alexej von Jawlensky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Self-Portrait- Tribute to Alexej von Jawlensky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side- View Self-Portrait- Tribute to Alexej von Jawlensky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side- View
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Alexej von Jawlensky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Alexej von Jawlensky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Alexej von Jawlensky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Self-Portrait- Tribute to Alexej von Jawlensky Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Self-Portrait- Tribute to Alexej von Jawlensky
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

“I knew that I must paint not what I saw, but only what was in me, in my soul. Figuratively speaking, it was like this: In my heart I felt as if there were an organ, which I had to sound. And nature, which I saw before me, only prompted me. And that was a key that unlocked this organ and made it sound… …They are songs without words.”

 

 

Day Fifty-Four- Yves Klein- Bad Taste

It’s day 54 and I spent the first night in my new home…I actually own a home!  Unpacking and organizing the kitchen and other things occupied most of my day, but I still had time to paint my boob blue in honor of Yves Klein!

Yves Klein

Yves Klein

Yves Klein

Yves Klein

Yves Klein (French: [iv klɛ̃]; 28 April 1928 – 6 June 1962) was a French artist considered an important figure in post-war European art. He is the leading member of the French artistic movement of Nouveau réalisme founded in 1960 by art critic Pierre Restany. Klein was a pioneer in the development of Performance art, and is seen as an inspiration to and as a forerunner of Minimal art, as well as Pop art.

Klein was born in Nice, in the Alpes-Maritimes department of France. His

Yves Klein

Yves Klein

parents, Fred Klein and Marie Raymond, were both painters. His father painted in a loose Post-impressionist style, while his mother was a leading figure in Art informel, and held regular soirées with other leading practitioners of this Parisian abstract movement.

Yves Klein

Yves Klein

From 1942 to 1946, Yves Klein studied at the École Nationale de la Marine Marchande and the École Nationale des Langues Orientales and began practicing judo. At this time, he became friends with Arman Fernandez and Claude Pascal and started to paint. At the age of nineteen, Klein and his friends lay on a beach in the south of France, and divided the world between themselves; Arman chose the earth, Claude, words, while Yves chose the ethereal space surrounding the planet, which he then proceeded to sign:

With this famous symbolic gesture of signing the sky, Klein had foreseen, as in a reverie, the thrust of his art from that time onwards—a quest to reach the far side of the infinite.

Between 1947 and 1948, Klein conceived his Monotone Symphony (1949, formally The

Yves Klein

Yves Klein

Monotone-Silence Symphony) that consisted of a single 20-minute sustained chord followed by a 20-minute silence – a precedent to both La Monte Young’s drone music and John Cage’s 4′33″. During the years 1948 to 1952, he traveled to Italy, Great Britain, Spain, and Japan. In Japan, at the early age of 25, he became a master at judo receiving the rank of yodan (4th dan/degree black-belt) from the Kodokan, which at that time was a remarkable achievement for a westerner. He also stayed in Japan in 1953. Klein later wrote a book on Judo called Les fondements du judo. In 1954, Klein settled permanently in Paris and began in earnest to establish himself in the art world.

Monochrome works: The Blue Epoch

Yves Klein

Yves Klein

Although Klein had painted monochromes as early as 1949, and held the first private exhibition of this work in 1950, his first public showing was the publication of the Artist’s book Yves: Peintures in November 1954. Parodying a traditional catalogue, the book featured a series of intense monochromes linked to various cities he had lived in during the previous years. Yves: Peintures anticipated his first two shows of oil paintings, at the Club des Solitaires, Paris, October 1955 and Yves: Proposition monochromes at Gallery Colette Allendy, February 1956. Public responses to these shows, which displayed orange, yellow, red, pink and blue monochromes, deeply disappointed Klein, as people went from painting to painting, linking them together as a sort of mosaic.

From the reactions of the audience, [Klein] realized that…viewers thought his various, uniformly colored canvases amounted to a new kind of bright, abstract interior decoration. Shocked at this misunderstanding, Klein knew a further and decisive step in the direction of monochrome art would have to be taken…From that time onwards he would concentrate on one single, primary color alone: blue.

The next exhibition, ‘Proposte Monochrome, Epoca Blu’ (Proposition Monochrome; Blue Epoch) at the Gallery Apollinaire, Milan,

Yves Klein

Yves Klein

(January 1957), featured 11 identical blue canvases, using ultramarine pigment suspended in a synthetic resin ‘Rhodopas,’ described by Klein as “The Medium.” Discovered with the help of Edouard Adam, a Parisian paint dealer, the optical effect retained the brilliance of the pigment which, when suspended in linseed oil, tended to become dull. Klein later deposited a Soleau envelope for this recipe to maintain the “authenticity of the pure idea.” This colour, reminiscent of the lapis lazuli used to paint the Madonna’s robes in medieval paintings, was to become famous as International Klein Blue(IKB). The paintings were attached to poles placed 20 cm away from the walls to increase their spatial ambiguities.

The show was a critical and commercial success, traveling to Paris, Düsseldorf and London. The Parisian exhibition, at the Iris Clert Gallery in May 1957, became a seminal happening.  To mark the opening, 1001 blue balloons were released and blue postcards were sent out using IKB stamps that Klein had bribed the postal service to accept as legitimate.  Concurrently, an exhibition of tubs of blue pigment and fire paintings was held at Gallery Collette Allendy.

Anthropométries

Yves Klein- Fire Painting

Yves Klein- Fire Painting

Despite the IKB paintings being uniformly coloured, Klein experimented with various methods of applying the paint; firstly different rollers and then later sponges, created a series of varied surfaces. This experimentalism would lead to a number of works Klein made using naked female models covered in blue paint and dragged across or laid upon canvases to make the image, using the models as “living brushes”. This type of work he called Anthropometry. Other paintings in this method of production include “recordings” of rain that Klein made by driving around in the rain at 70 miles per hour with a canvas tied to the roof of his car, and canvases with patterns of soot created by scorching the canvas with gas burners.

Klein and Arman were continually involved with each other creatively, both as Nouveaux Réalistes and as friends. Both from Nice, the two worked together for many years and Arman even named his son, Yves Arman after Yves Klein who was his god-father.

Sometimes the creation of these paintings was turned into a kind of performance art—an event in 1960, for example, had an audience dressed in formal evening wear watching the models go about their task while an instrumental ensemble played Klein’s 1949 The Monotone Symphony (a single 20-minute sustained chord followed by a 20-minute silence).

In the performance piece, Zone de Sensibilité Picturale Immatérielle (Zones of Immaterial Pictorial Sensibility) 1959–62, he

Yves Klein- Fire Painting

Yves Klein- Fire Painting

offered empty spaces in the city in exchange for gold. He wanted his buyers to experience The Void by selling them empty space. In his view this experience could only be paid for in the purest material: gold. In exchange, he gave a certificate of ownership to the buyer. As the second part of the piece, performed on the Seine with an Art critic in attendance, if the buyer agreed to set fire to the certificate, Klein would throw half the gold into the river, in order to restore the “natural order” that he had unbalanced by selling the empty space (that was now not “empty” anymore). He used the other half of the gold to create a series of gold-leafed works, which, along with a series of pink monochromes, began to augment his blue monochromes toward the end of his life.

The critic Pierre Restany, whom he had met during his first public exhibition at the Club Solitaire,[14][not in citation given] founded the Nouveau Réalisme group in Klein’s apartment on 27 October 1960. Founding members were Arman, Francois Dufrêne, Raymond Hains, Yves Klein, Martial Raysse, Daniel Spoerri, Jean Tinguely, and Jacques Villeglé, with Niki de Saint Phalle, Christoand Gérard Deschamps joining later. Normally seen as a French version of Pop Art, the aim of the group was stated as ‘New Realism=New Perceptual Approaches To The Real’.[15][not in citation given]

A large retrospective was held at Krefeld, Germany, January 1961, followed by an unsuccessful opening at Leo Castelli’s Gallery, New York, in which Klein failed to sell a single painting. He stayed with Rotraut Uecker at the Chelsea Hotel for the duration of the exhibition; and, while there, he wrote the “Chelsea Hotel Manifesto”, a proclamation of the “multiplicity of new possibilities.” In part, the manifesto declared:

At present, I am particularly excited by “bad taste.” I have the deep feeling that there exists in the very essence of bad taste a power capable of creating those things situated far beyond what is traditionally termed “The Work of Art.” I wish to play with human feeling, with its “morbidity” in a cold and ferocious manner. Only very recently I have become a sort of gravedigger of art (oddly enough, I am using the very terms of my enemies). Some of my latest works have been coffins and tombs. During the same time I succeeded in painting with fire, using particularly powerful and searing gas flames, some of them measuring three to four meters high. I use these to bathe the surface of the painting in such a way that it registered the spontaneous trace of fire.

Read the rest of his biography at wikipedia.

About to paint my boob!

About to paint my boob!

I obviously had fun while creating this painting.  How often are you going to use your body as

Ha!

Ha!

the art tool?  Well, I guess you can do it every day if you want to!  It felt a little chaotic since you never know exactly how it’s going to turn out.  I decided to paint in my bathroom so that I could jump in the shower after.  Also, I don’t exactly have my new studio set up yet.

After using my breast…I decided the painting needed more so I did a hand print and other details.

I hope you enjoy my final piece and I’ll see you tomorrow Day 55!

Best, Linda

Mono-Boob- Tribute to Yves Klein Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Mono-Boob- Tribute to Yves Klein
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View Mono-Boob- Tribute to Yves Klein Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side-View
Mono-Boob- Tribute to Yves Klein
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1 Mono-Boob- Tribute to Yves Klein Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 1
Mono-Boob- Tribute to Yves Klein
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2 Mono-Boob- Tribute to Yves Klein Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close-Up 2
Mono-Boob- Tribute to Yves Klein
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

 

Day 53- Clyfford Still- Inner Light

Day 53!  It’s actually day 53…hopefully I don’t fall behind again now that I’m in my new house.  This is another painting I thoroughly enjoyed painting even though I was up at 2AM painting it!  Join me in celebrating Clyfford Still!

Clyfford Still

Clyfford Still

Clyfford Still

Clyfford Still

Clyfford Still (November 30, 1904 – June 23, 1980) was an American painter, and one of the leading figures of Abstract Expressionism.

Clyfford Still was a leader in the first generation of Abstract Expressionists who developed a new, powerful approach to painting in the years immediately following World War II. Still’s contemporaries included Philip Guston, Franz Kline, Willem de Kooning, Robert Motherwell, Barnett Newman, Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko. Though the styles and approaches of these artists varied considerably, Abstract Expressionism is marked by abstract forms, expressive brushwork, and monumental scale, all of which were used to convey universal themes about creation, life, struggle, and death (“the human condition”), themes that took on a considerable relevance during and after World War II. Described by many as the most anti-traditional of the Abstract Expressionists, Still is credited with laying the groundwork for the movement. Still’s shift from representational painting to abstraction occurred between 1938 and 1942, earlier than his colleagues, who continued to paint in figurative-surrealist styles well into the 1940s.

Still was born in 1904 in Grandin, North Dakota and spent his childhood in Spokane,

Clyfford Still 1962

Clyfford Still 1962

Washington and Bow Island in southern Alberta, Canada. Although Abstract Expressionism is identified as a New York movement, Still’s formative works were created during various teaching posts on the West Coast, first at Washington State University (1935–41). His work of this period is marked by an expressive figurative style used in depictions of the people, buildings, tools and machinery characteristic of farm life. By the late 1930s, he began to simplify his forms as he moved from representational painting toward abstraction. In 1941 Still relocated to the San Francisco Bay area where, following work in various war industries, he became a highly influential professor at the California School of Fine Arts, now known as the San Francisco Art Institute. He taught there from 1946-1950 (with a break in the summer of 1948 when he returned to New York). It was during this time when Still “broke through” to his mature style. Still also taught at the Richmond Professional Institute (RPI) nowVirginia Commonwealth University from 1943 to 1945.

Clyfford Still

Clyfford Still

Still visited New York for extended stays in the late 1940s and became associated with two of the galleries that launched the new American art to the world — Peggy Guggenheim’s The Art of This Century Gallery and the Betty Parsons gallery. Rothko introduced him to Peggy Guggenheim, who gave him a solo exhibition at her Art of This Century gallery in early 1946. Later that year, the artist returned to San Francisco, where he taught for the next four years at the California School of Fine Arts.  He lived in New York for most of the 1950s, the height of Abstract Expressionism, but also a time when he became increasingly critical of the art world. In the early 1950s, Still severed ties with commercial galleries and in 1961 moved to a 22 acre farm near Westminster, Maryland, removing himself further from the art world. The property was located on eastern side of Old Westminster Road about one-half mile north of the intersection with Stone Chapel Road. Still used a barn on the property as a studio during the warm weather months. In 1966, Still and his wife purchased a large 4,300 square foot house at 312 Church Street in New Windsor, Maryland about 8 miles from their farm primarily to store his paintings. Art critic Katharine Kuh described the large home as “filled to capacity with multiple rolled canvases, each identified by Pat with a small sketch of the original” with only a cramped section of the kitchen reserved for entertaining.

He remained in Maryland with his second wife, Patricia, until his death in 1980. Following his death, all works that had not entered

Clyfford Still

Clyfford Still

the public domain were sealed off from both public and scholarly view, closing off access to one of the most significant American painters of the 20th century.

Still was also considered one of the foremost Color Field painters – his non-figurative paintings are non-objective, and largely concerned with juxtaposing different colors and surfaces in a variety of formations. Unlike Mark Rothko or Barnett Newman who organized their colors in a relatively simple way (Rothko in the form of nebulous rectangles, Newman in thin lines on vast fields of color), Still’s arrangements are less regular. His jagged flashes of color give the impression that one layer of color has been “torn” off the painting, revealing the colors underneath.

Clyfford Still 1957

Clyfford Still 1957

Another point of departure with Newman and Rothko is the way the paint is laid on the canvas; while Rothko and Newman used fairly flat colors and relatively thin paint, Still uses a thick impasto, causing subtle variety and shades that shimmer across the painting surfaces. His large mature works recall natural forms and natural phenomena at its most intense and mysterious; ancient stalagmites, caverns, foliage, seen both in darkness and in light lend poetic richness and depth to his work.

By 1947, he had begun working in the format that he would intensify and refine

Clyfford Still 1944

Clyfford Still 1944

throughout the rest of his career — a large-scale color field applied with palette knives.  Among Still’s well known paintings is 1957-D No. 1, 1957, (above), which is mainly black and yellow with patches of white and a small amount of red. These four colors, and variations on them (purples, dark blues) are predominant in his work, although there is a tendency for his paintings to use darker shades.

Read more of his extensive biography from wikipedia.

Again, I really enjoyed creating this piece amid the chaos of my move!  I don’t even know how I’m still standing…or currently sitting.  I feel like if I close my eyes for longer than a blink I’m going to fall into a 3 day coma…yes, specifically 3 days.  I hope you enjoy my tribute!  I’m going to go unpack boxes now.  See you tomorrow on Day 54!  Wee!  Linda

PS I apologize for the lighting in the picture if it seems weird.  I didn’t have time to take a photo during daylight so I had to pin it up in my new laundry room and take a photo. 😉

It's 2AM and I'm insane.

It’s 2AM and I’m insane.

2014 D- Tribute to Clyfford Still Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

2014 D- Tribute to Clyfford Still
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side View 2014 D- Tribute to Clyfford Still Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side View
2014 D- Tribute to Clyfford Still
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close Up 1 2014 D- Tribute to Clyfford Still Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close Up 1
2014 D- Tribute to Clyfford Still
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close Up 2 2014 D- Tribute to Clyfford Still Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close Up 2
2014 D- Tribute to Clyfford Still
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

You can turn the lights out. The paintings will carry their own fire. (Clyfford Still)

 

 

 

Day 52- Hans Hartung- Deep Expressions

Day 52 a day late, but I painted and I’m posting two blogs and paintings today!  I’m officially moved into my new house and I LOVE IT!!  Yesterday I wasn’t able to post my blog because our internet wasn’t working.  So, that’s my excuse!  I need to unpack and clean so join me in celebrating Hans Hartung!

Hans Hartung, 1960s /Fritz Pitz /sc

Hans Hartung, 1960s /Fritz Pitz /sc

Untitled 1956

Untitled 1956

Hans Hartung (21 September 1904 – 7 December 1989) was a German-French painter, known for his gestural abstract style. He was also a decorated World War II veteran of the French Foreign Legion.

Hartung was born in Leipzig, Germany into an artistic family. He developed an early

Hans Hartung

Hans Hartung

appreciation of Rembrandt, German painters such as Lovis Corinth, and the Expressionists Oskar Kokoschka and Emil Nolde. In 1924 he enrolled in Leipzig University, where he studied philosophy and art history.

He subsequently studied at the Fine Arts academy of Dresden, where he copied the paintings of the masters. The modern French and Spanish works he saw in 1926 at the Internationale Kunstausstellung in Dresden were a revelation to him, and he decided that he would leave his native country to prevent succumbing to provincialism. Consequently, after a bicycle trip through Italy, he moved to Paris.

Hans Hartung

Hans Hartung

In Paris Hartung had little contact with other artists, and copied the works of old and modern masters. He visited the south of France, where the landscape inspired him to a close study of the works of Cézanne, and he developed a great interest in principles of harmony and proportion such as the golden section.

In 1928 he visited Munich where he studied painting technique with Max

Hans Hartung

Hans Hartung

Doerner. In 1929 he married the artist Anna-Eva Bergman and established himself in the French towns of Leucate, and then in the Spanish Balearic Islands, eventually settling inMinorca. He exhibited for the first time in 1931 in Dresden.

Hans Hartung

Hans Hartung

The death of his father in 1932 severed Hartung’s last bonds with Germany. He was rejected from Nazi Germany on account of being a ‘degenerate’, because his painting style was associated with Cubism – an art movement incompatible with Nazi Germany’s ideals. In 1935 when he attempted to sell paintings while visiting Berlin, the police tried to arrest him. He was able to flee the country with the help of his friend Christian Zervos.

After he returned to Paris as a refugee, Hartung and his wife divorced, and he

Hans Hartung

Hans Hartung

became depressive. His paintings were becoming more abstract and did not sell well. His friends tried to help him with his financial difficulties, and the sculptor Julio González offered him the use of his studio. In 1939 Hartung married González’s daughter Roberta.

In December 1939, he became a member of the French Foreign Legion. He was closely followed by the Gestapo and arrested for seven months by the French police. After they learned he was a painter, he was put in a red cell in an attempt to disturb his vision. After being released he rejoined the Legion to fight in North Africa, losing a leg in a battle near Belfort. He earned French citizenship in 1945, and was awarded the Croix de Guerre.

In 1947 in Paris he had his first solo exhibition. By the late 1950s he had achieved recognition for his gestural paintings, which were nearly monochromatic and characterized by configurations of long rhythmical brushstrokes or scratches. In 1960 he was awarded the International Grand Prix for painting at the Venice Biennale.

Hartung’s freewheeling abstract paintings set influential precedents for many younger American painters of the sixties, making him an important forerunner of American Lyrical Abstraction of the 1960s and 1970s. He was featured in the 1963 film documentary “School of Paris: (5 Artists at Work)” by American filmmaker Warren Forma.

In the 1970s, Hartung and Anna-Eva Bergman remarried. He died on 7 December 1989, in Antibes, France.

Biography is from wikipedia.

This painting was so pleasant to create, especially during the insanity of my move.  I researched him and examined his art and couldn’t wait to start on my piece.  I hope you enjoy it!  See you in a few minutes for Day 53 and then tomorrow for painting 54!  Hopefully everything will work on schedule from now on.  Best, Linda

Getting the background done.  So fun!

Getting the background done. So fun!

Untitled 52- Tribute to Hans Hartung Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Untitled 52- Tribute to Hans Hartung
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Side View Untitled 52- Tribute to Hans Hartung Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Side View
Untitled 52- Tribute to Hans Hartung
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close Up 1 Untitled 52- Tribute to Hans Hartung Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close Up 1
Untitled 52- Tribute to Hans Hartung
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close Up 2 Untitled 52- Tribute to Hans Hartung Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close Up 2
Untitled 52- Tribute to Hans Hartung
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

Close Up 3 Untitled 52- Tribute to Hans Hartung Linda Cleary 2014 Acrylic on Canvas

Close Up 3
Untitled 52- Tribute to Hans Hartung
Linda Cleary 2014
Acrylic on Canvas

 

 

 

 

 

Bad news…kind of.

I did my painting, but can’t post an extensive blog since we’re moving and I can’t use my computer. I’m posting this via my phone! I will post two blogs and paintings tomorrow! Here’s my tribute to Hans Hartung for now.

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